Working with the Child Welfare System

When children involved in the child welfare system need medical care, they are particularly in need of providers knowledgeable in trauma-informed care. Illness- or injury-related posttraumatic stress reactions can impair a child's psychosocial / functional recovery and lead to worse health outcomes. While any ill or injured child may experience pediatric medical traumatic stress (PMTS), children in foster care, who often have a prior trauma history or lack social support, are at greater risk.

Enhance your skills in trauma-informed care and learn tips for working effectively with the child welfare system as a health care professional.

Register today for the new free continuing education course (1.0 CEU) for nurses! 

 

PMTS and Working with Child Welfare Systems Nursing Course

 

Trauma can be both a medical and psychological event in the eyes of children and families experiencing serious illnesses, injuries, or painful procedures. By enhancing patient centered care with trauma informed care, health care providers can reduce the impact of difficult or frightening medical events, and help children and families cope with emotional reactions to illness and injury.

How Doctors and Nurses Make a Difference with Trauma Informed Care

Healthcare providers are experts in treating illness and saving lives. After attending to the basics of physical health (A-B-C: Airway, Breathing, Circulation), you can promote psychosocial recovery by paying attention to the D-E-F (Distress, Emotional Support, Family).

What is Trauma Informed Care?

Trauma-informed care shares many principles with patient centered care. However, trauma informed care incorporates an awareness of the impact of traumatic stress on ill or injured children and families as a part of treating the medical aspects of the trauma.

Last Updated (August 22, 2016)

 

Blog

Thank You from Us to You!

We here at the Center for Pediatric Traumatic Stress (CPTS), who run the HealthCareToolbox.org site and this blog, want to take this week’s blog post to send grateful thanks to all of our readers and to update you on our future endeavors. 

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Intersection of Culture, Trauma, and Trauma Informed Care

When a child and family enter a hospital or medical setting, many factors contribute to their perception of trauma and their reactions to it. Developmental age, prior medical experiences, previous non-medical trauma can all contribute to their reactions. As can their cultural background. 

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Spreading Trauma Informed Care Throughout a Hospital System

When speaking of a trauma informed practice, the responsibility for implementation often lands on the individual doctor, nurses, or other healthcare professional. However, for patients and families to truly experience trauma informed medical care, the entire hospital system needs to embrace trauma informed care.  

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Do You Follow Your Own Advice?

As a pediatric health care provider, how often do you explain to parents / caregivers the importance of taking care of themselves? Self care, you explain, is like pulling down your own oxygen mask first, so you will be better equipped to help others. But how many times, as a health care provider, do you practice what you preach?

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